Lesson Topic: Putting data into fractions
Teaching Date: 4/16
Planning Date: 4/13
Big Ideas: Fractions can help us understand and evaluate data; Spreadsheets are a useful tool for organizing and evaluating data.
Inquiry Questions: How can we compile data into fractions to help us better understand what the data is telling us?
Knowledge Outcomes: Students will know how to transfer data
Skill Outcomes:
Evidence of Understanding:
Rubric:
Sequence of the lesson
Transition: Students are coming from:
Hook:
"The next step in our Census Project is to record the data, and to make sense of it. Working in pairs or groups of three, choose a grade to calculate some data."

Activities:
Students will work in pairs, with one group of three.
"You will need to find the answers for the following questions for each class:
What fraction of the class is boys?
What fraction of the class is girls?
What fraction of the school is this class?
What fraction of the students have a birthday in January? February? March? etc...
What fraction of the total school population is this class?

What fraction of the class prefers art? music? gym? computers? library? other (say what it is)? did not respond?
What fraction of the class would like an optional study period during the school day? Would not like one? Did not respond?
What fraction of the class can do 0-10 minutes of homework per night? 11-20? 21-30? 31-40? 41-50? 51-60? 61-70? more than 70?
Make an organized chart to show how people responded to “subjects need to improve on.”
Make an organized chart to show what colors students would choose for school colors.
Make an organized chart to show what students want to be when they grow up.
Make an organized chart to show what fraction of students would prefer to eat hot lunch.
Make an organized chart to show what fraction of students would prefer to bring their own lunch.
Make an organized chart to show what students want to eat for hot lunch.

*NR = “no response”

When students are finished, they can contribute their answers to a running total, using 83 as the denominator instead (for the total number of kids in the school, rather than just in the class.)
Use a piece of chart paper to create an organized chart to show the answers for the whole school.
Boys: x/83
Girls: x/83
PreK: x/83
K: x/83
1: x/83
2: x/83 etc...


Sponge Activity: Write a report to school officials telling them something about the school based on your findings. Example: Dear Head of School, Here at JCDS we really like our hot lunch. In fact, 79/83 students would prefer to eat hot lunch over bringing their own, according to a recent survey.
Wrap-Up: What other real-world situations would fractions come in as a useful skill? When would you use fractions in the real world?
Groupwork/Grouping: Pairs or threes
Classroom Environment: They will need to spread out a bit
Materials Needed: Worksheet, census results, chart paper, writing utensils
Potential Pitfalls: They won't be challenged, or they won't be clear on what to do
Differentiation: Students will be working with real information to present it in a different way using fractions. They could also use illustrations to represent their answers.