May 14

Lesson Topic:
Kabbalat Shabbat

Teaching Date:
Friday, March 19, 1:30—1:50

Planning Date:
Mar. 18

Big Ideas: What are the big ideas or enduring understandings?
K.S. Is a time to reflect on this week's Torah learning.

K.S. Is a time to transition from the school week to Shabbat.

Inquiry Questions for the Lesson: Important, open-ended questions?
What did we learn in this week's Torah portion?

How can we make K.S. a time of separation between the week and Shabbat?

Knowledge Outcomes: Content knowledge students should gain?
Students will know what the parsha is, what it says, and the significance of the small alef

Skill Outcomes: What skills do you intend for students to learn or practice?
Students will know how to think about not only the words of the Torah, but also the letters, and what “secrets” they might contain.

Evidence of Understanding: What kind of evidence would prove to you that students have gained the intended knowledge or skills? What kind of assessment will you use to gather that evidence?
Students will answer questions that the student discussion leader asks about the parsha, and interpretations of the parsha

Rubric: What is the grading rubric?
Sequence of the lesson
Transition: Where are the students coming from? How does that affect your plan? How will you transition students to your lesson?
Students are transitioning from their classes, fifth grade will have packed up and will be sitting at their desks. They will sing “welcome to fifth grade” and “Lecha Dodi”

Hook: What will you do at the beginning to arouse the intellectual curiosity of the children? How will you open the lesson? Will you make any connections to previous lessons?
Who can tell me the name of this week's parsha, and what is so special about this week's parsha?”
It's parshat Vayikra, which is the first parsha of the Book of Vayikra

Activities: Step-by-step with directions and key questions. How will you uncover student thinking? How do you anticipate students will respond? Include plans for each transition within the lesson.

This class will be led by a student discussion leader (preselected during Chumash, she will know the sequence). She would introduce the Parsha: She would start by asking who knows this week's parsha
Who knows what this week's parsha is, and what is new or exciting or different about it?” (call on a 3rd or 4th grader).
This week's parsha is Vayikra. It is special because it starts a new sefer, also called Vayikra.


Summary of parsha: This parsha talks about the different kinds of korbanot—or offerings/sacrifices—that people brought to the Temple when it existed.

Commentary of parsha:
This week in Torah Project, we talked about the word Vayikra.
In the Chumash, this word is written in the Chumash with a small Aleph.

(She could write ויקרא on the board.) We discussed why this might be.

She would read the Hebrew and English text:
וַיִּקְרָא אֶל- מֹשֶׁה; וַיְדַבֵּר יְהוָה אֵלָיו, מֵאֹהֶל מוֹעֵד לֵאמֹר.
"And the LORD called unto Moses, and spoke unto him out of the tent of meeting, saying..."

"Does anyone in fourth or third grade have any idea why the aleph is small in the pasuk?"
Take two or three ideas. Acknowledge these ideas.

"Can someone in fifth grade summarize the possibilities we talked about why the aleph is smaller?"

Call on a fifth grader to explain that the text reads "G-d called onto Moses..."
but if you take away the aleph, you get ויקר אל משה which means G-d happened to Moshe...

or G-d chanced upon Moshe. Some rabbis say that this shows how humble and modest
Moshe is, that he didn't want to say that G-d called out to him (specifically sought him), but rather chanced upon him.

What do you think is the difference between "G-d called out to Moshe" and "G-d happened/chanced upon Moshe" ?

Take several responses.


Pass out the juice and the challah, and say the prayers.
Wrap up by saying:

When we read Chumash, we not only think about the message of the words, but also we can learn something about the letters themselves. A lot of rabbis and people think that there are great secrets in the letters of the Torah (Gematria is using the values of the letters themselves to try to learn hidden messages of the Torah.)
Sponge activity: If you are planning individual or small group work, what will students do if they finish early?
The discussion leader can ask where else in the Chumash are there letters that are a different size? (Shema)

Wrap-Up: How will you pull things together, have students process what they’ve learned, pose a question for further consideration?
When we read Chumash, we not only think about the message of the words, but also we can learn something about the letters themselves. A lot of rabbis and people think that there are great secrets in the letters of the Torah (Gematria is using the values of the letters themselves to try to learn hidden messages of the Torah.)
Groupwork: If you are grouping at some point during the lesson…Why are you grouping? How are you grouping?Students will work in one big group.
Classroom Environment: How can you use the classroom environment to support your lesson? Think about bulletin boards, morning message, display areas.
Fifth graders at their desks, 4th and 3rd graders on rug.

Materials Needed: What materials do you need to gather? What other preparation do you need to do?
Potential Pitfalls What can you predict students may have misconceptions about? How will you address those confusions? Are there any other pitfalls?
Differentiation: (optional in Fall) Do you address the range of interests, learning styles, and needs of students? Can you modify the lesson to be more effective?

March 19

Lesson Topic:
Kabbalat Shabbat

Teaching Date:
Friday, March 19, 1:30—1:50

Planning Date:
Mar. 18

Big Ideas: What are the big ideas or enduring understandings?
K.S. Is a time to reflect on this week's Torah learning.

K.S. Is a time to transition from the school week to Shabbat.

Inquiry Questions for the Lesson: Important, open-ended questions?
What did we learn in this week's Torah portion?

How can we make K.S. a time of separation between the week and Shabbat?

Knowledge Outcomes: Content knowledge students should gain?
Students will know what the parsha is, what it says, and the significance of the small alef

Skill Outcomes: What skills do you intend for students to learn or practice?
Students will know how to think about not only the words of the Torah, but also the letters, and what “secrets” they might contain.

Evidence of Understanding: What kind of evidence would prove to you that students have gained the intended knowledge or skills? What kind of assessment will you use to gather that evidence?
Students will answer questions that the student discussion leader asks about the parsha, and interpretations of the parsha

Rubric: What is the grading rubric?
Sequence of the lesson
Transition: Where are the students coming from? How does that affect your plan? How will you transition students to your lesson?
Students are transitioning from their classes, fifth grade will have packed up and will be sitting at their desks. They will sing “welcome to fifth grade” and “Lecha Dodi”

Hook: What will you do at the beginning to arouse the intellectual curiosity of the children? How will you open the lesson? Will you make any connections to previous lessons?
Who can tell me the name of this week's parsha, and what is so special about this week's parsha?”
It's parshat Vayikra, which is the first parsha of the Book of Vayikra

Activities: Step-by-step with directions and key questions. How will you uncover student thinking? How do you anticipate students will respond? Include plans for each transition within the lesson.

This class will be led by a student discussion leader (preselected during Chumash, she will know the sequence). She would introduce the Parsha: She would start by asking who knows this week's parsha
Who knows what this week's parsha is, and what is new or exciting or different about it?” (call on a 3rd or 4th grader).
This week's parsha is Vayikra. It is special because it starts a new sefer, also called Vayikra.


Summary of parsha: This parsha talks about the different kinds of korbanot—or offerings/sacrifices—that people brought to the Temple when it existed.

Commentary of parsha:
This week in Torah Project, we talked about the word Vayikra.
In the Chumash, this word is written in the Chumash with a small Aleph.

(She could write ויקרא on the board.) We discussed why this might be.

She would read the Hebrew and English text:
וַיִּקְרָא אֶל- מֹשֶׁה; וַיְדַבֵּר יְהוָה אֵלָיו, מֵאֹהֶל מוֹעֵד לֵאמֹר.
"And the LORD called unto Moses, and spoke unto him out of the tent of meeting, saying..."

"Does anyone in fourth or third grade have any idea why the aleph is small in the pasuk?"
Take two or three ideas. Acknowledge these ideas.

"Can someone in fifth grade summarize the possibilities we talked about why the aleph is smaller?"

Call on a fifth grader to explain that the text reads "G-d called onto Moses..."

but if you take away the aleph, you get ויקר אל משה which means G-d happened to Moshe...

or G-d chanced upon Moshe. Some rabbis say that this shows how humble and modest
Moshe is, that he didn't want to say that G-d called out to him (specifically sought him), but rather chanced upon him.

What do you think is the difference between "G-d called out to Moshe" and "G-d happened/chanced upon Moshe" ?


Take several responses.

Pass out the juice and the challah, and say the prayers.
Wrap up by saying:

When we read Chumash, we not only think about the message of the words, but also we can learn something about the letters themselves. A lot of rabbis and people think that there are great secrets in the letters of the Torah (Gematria is using the values of the letters themselves to try to learn hidden messages of the Torah.)
Sponge activity: If you are planning individual or small group work, what will students do if they finish early?
The discussion leader can ask where else in the Chumash are there letters that are a different size? (Shema)



Wrap-Up: How will you pull things together, have students process what they’ve learned, pose a question for further consideration?
When we read Chumash, we not only think about the message of the words, but also we can learn something about the letters themselves. A lot of rabbis and people think that there are great secrets in the letters of the Torah (Gematria is using the values of the letters themselves to try to learn hidden messages of the Torah.)


Groupwork: If you are grouping at some point during the lesson…Why are you grouping? How are you grouping?Students will work in one big group.
Classroom Environment: How can you use the classroom environment to support your lesson? Think about bulletin boards, morning message, display areas.
Fifth graders at their desks, 4th and 3rd graders on rug.

Materials Needed: What materials do you need to gather? What other preparation do you need to do?
Potential Pitfalls What can you predict students may have misconceptions about? How will you address those confusions? Are there any other pitfalls?
Differentiation: (optional in Fall) Do you address the range of interests, learning styles, and needs of students? Can you modify the lesson to be more effective?