Poetry Unit

Date
Lesson
5/4
1- Poetry is emotion:
What does this mean? How does this feel?
In class: list strong emotions; list words that convey strong emotions; list beautiful words, written in ways that capture power and essence of the emotions & beauty- post words all over classroom
5/7
2- Language & poetic conventions
Alliteration, Figurative language, line breaks
In class: choose objects to describe poetically
5/11
3- Different forms of poetry: see lesson plan
5/14
4- Six-room poetry w/ factory: see lesson plan
5/18
5- Independent writing for entire period
5/21
6- Independent writing for entire period
5/25
7- Last in class day to complete poems

Final Performance Assessment

Guidelines

Each poet will craft (a minimum of) four polished poems from the themes of:
  • Freedom
  • Shemot
  • Factory
  • Nature/sustainability
Each poem will use (at least) three of the following poetic conventions in each poem (and all of the poetic conventions must be used at least once in all four):
  • Alliteration
  • Analogy
  • Imagery
  • Metaphor
  • Mood
  • Onomatopoeia
  • Personification
  • Repetition
  • Rhyme
  • Simile
  • Stanza

Other guidelines

  • At least one poem must use rhyme.
  • At least two poems must be free verse, sans rhymes.
  • Poems can be typed or written neatly.
  • All spelling is correct

Rubric

A+
All of the above expectations were met
Poetry used emotion, originality and illustrative language

A, A-, B+
Most of the above expectations were met
Poetry used some emotion, originality and illustrative language

B, B-
Some of the above expectations were met
Poetry used little emotion, originality or illustrative language

C+, C, C-
Few of the above expectations were met
D or F
Hardly any of the above expectations were met, less than four polished poems

Lesson 1

Different forms of poetry
Lesson Topic:
Different forms of poetry

Teaching Date:
5/11

Planning Date:
Big Ideas: What are the big ideas or enduring understandings?
Words can be used in fun and emotive ways
Poetry comes in many forms

Inquiry Questions for the Lesson: Important, open-ended questions?
How can you use the sounds and meanings of words to create poetry?
What are the different forms of poetry?

Knowledge Outcomes: Content knowledge students should gain?
Students should know the basic elements/definition of poetry
Students should be familiar with different types of poetry

Skill Outcomes: What skills do you intend for students to learn or practice?
Students should know how to write different forms of poetry

Evidence of Understanding: What kind of evidence would prove to you that students have gained the intended knowledge or skills? What kind of assessment will you use to gather that evidence?
Students will be able to identify and define different types of poetry, and produce at least three poems from the following: Couplet, list poem, limerick

Sequence of the lesson
Transition
Where are the students coming from? How does that affect your plan? How will you transition students to your lesson?
Students are transitioning from a math test, so they will all be starting at different times.

Hook
What will you do at the beginning to arouse the intellectual curiosity of the children? How will you open the lesson? Will you make any connections to previous lessons?
Students will read about several different types of poetry in Writers Express, p. 184—187

Activities
Step-by-step with directions and key questions. How will you uncover student thinking? How do you anticipate students will respond? Include plans for each transition within the lesson.
Directions:
Read Writers Express p184—187
Try writing 3 forms of poetry:
Couplet
List Poem
Limerick
(Acrostic)

Rubric: What is the grading rubric?Students will not be graded on this work
Sponge activity
If you are planning individual or small group work, what will students do if they finish early?
Students can work on additional poems
Wrap-Up
How will you pull things together, have students process what they’ve learned, pose a question for further consideration?
Students will share some of their poems
Groupwork: If you are grouping at some point during the lesson…Why are you grouping? How are you grouping?
N/A
Classroom Environment: How can you use the classroom environment to support your lesson? Think about bulletin boards, morning message, display areas.
I will use the whiteboard to give directions.
Materials Needed: What materials do you need to gather? What other preparation do you need to do?

Writers Express; MMJs; pencils
Potential Pitfalls What can you predict students may have misconceptions about? How will you address those confusions? Are there any other pitfalls?
It might be hard to start this work on their own. It will be hard to answer any questions they might have without disturbing the test-takers.
Differentiation: (optional in Fall) Do you address the range of interests, learning styles, and needs of students? Can you modify the lesson to be more effective?
Students can work at their own pace and choose the type of poetry they want to write.

Lesson 2

Six-room poetry
Lesson Topic:
Using the senses in poetry

Teaching Date:
5/14/10

Planning Date:
Big Ideas: What are the big ideas or enduring understandings?
Poetry uses the senses
Inquiry Questions for the Lesson: Important, open-ended questions?
How can you use poetic words to describe sights, sounds, smells, touches, and feelings?
How can we convey the senses in words?
How can we describe things in different ways?

Knowledge Outcomes: Content knowledge students should gain?
Students should know how to tap into their various senses and describe them in words

Skill Outcomes: What skills do you intend for students to learn or practice?
Students should know how to use words to describe a situation from various aspects (sights, smells, sounds, etc)

Evidence of Understanding: What kind of evidence would prove to you that students have gained the intended knowledge or skills? What kind of assessment will you use to gather that evidence?
Students will describe a room using different senses.

Sequence of the lesson
Transition
Where are the students coming from? How does that affect your plan? How will you transition students to your lesson?
Students are transitioning from writing their Friday letters. They may finish at different times, but I will get started when the majority of the class is ready.

Hook
What will you do at the beginning to arouse the intellectual curiosity of the children? How will you open the lesson? Will you make any connections to previous lessons?
I can use the projector or overhead, or write the directions on the board.
Directions:
We are going to use our paper to describe an image. You will use each of the six boxes to write about a different aspect of the same image. You do not have to use the boxes in any sort of order.
Activities

5 minutes for directions

Give 5-10 min for first poem

Give 5-10 min for 2nd poem

Step-by-step with directions and key questions. How will you uncover student thinking? How do you anticipate students will respond? Include plans for each transition within the lesson.

"Close your eyes and try to see your room or a previous childhood room as clearly as a photograph. In the first box, think about the colors you see? Now think about this same room. In the second box, just focus on the quality of light. What is the light like in the room? Describe it. For the third box, picture the same image and focus only on the sounds. What do you hear? For the fourth box: write down any questions you have about the image. What do you wonder? In the fifth box, write down any feelings you have about this image. How do you feel? In the sixth box, try to create a poem... Give 5-10 minutes

"We are going to try it again. Fold another piece of paper into six sections. Listen to the directions again: Close your eyes and try to see a factory as clearly as a photograph. In the first box, think about the colors you see? Now think about this same room. In the second box, just focus on the quality of light. What is the light like in the room? Describe it. For the third box, picture the same image and focus only on the sounds. What do you hear? For the fourth box: write down any questions you have about the image. What do you wonder? In the fifth box, write down any feelings you have about this image. How do you feel? In the sixth box, try to create a poem... Give 5-10 minutes
Rubric: What is the grading rubric?Students will not be graded on this work...but may be part of their final poetry work
Sponge activity
If you are planning individual or small group work, what will students do if they finish early?
Students can work on additional poems
Wrap-Up
How will you pull things together, have students process what they’ve learned, pose a question for further consideration?
Students will share some of their poems
Groupwork: If you are grouping at some point during the lesson…Why are you grouping? How are you grouping?
N/A
Classroom Environment: How can you use the classroom environment to support your lesson? Think about bulletin boards, morning message, display areas.
I will use the whiteboard to give directions.
Materials Needed: What materials do you need to gather? What other preparation do you need to do?
Piece of white paper; MMJs; pencils
Potential Pitfalls What can you predict students may have misconceptions about? How will you address those confusions? Are there any other pitfalls?
Differentiation: (optional in Fall) Do you address the range of interests, learning styles, and needs of students? Can you modify the lesson to be more effective?
Students can work at their own pace and choose the type of poetry they want to write.

Lesson 3/4/5

Writing Poetry

Lesson Topic:
Independent poetry writing
Teaching Date:
5/18/10 Tues
5/21 Fri
5/25 Tues

Planning:
5/14
Big Ideas:
Poetry is used to convey emotions, feelings, images, situations
Poetry comes in many forms
Poetry is intimate

Inquiry Questions for the Lesson: Important, open-ended questions?
How can you use poetic words to describe sights, sounds, smells, touches, and feelings?
How can we convey the senses in words?
How can we describe things in different ways?
What forms of poetry can we use?
How can we use different forms of poetry for different results?

Knowledge Outcomes: Content knowledge students should gain?
Students should know how to tap into their various senses and describe them in words; Students should know that they are all poets and can write in many different forms of poetry

Skill Outcomes: What skills do you intend for students to learn or practice?
Students should know how to use words to create a poem
Students should know how to use poetic conventions in their writing
Students should know how to write different forms of poems

Evidence of Understanding: What kind of evidence would prove to you that students have gained the intended knowledge or skills? What kind of assessment will you use to gather that evidence?
Students will eventually create four polished pieces of poetry, following certain guidelines.

Sequence of the lesson
Transition
Students are transitioning from art. They will need their MMJs and a writing utensil.
Hook
Read:
Insomnia
"The
pink glow precedes the sun like radiation on the New Mexican horizon. I don't dare turn on any lights because I know the sun's glow will strengthen in time. Artificial light would only make me realize that "a good night's sleep" has been forfeited once again. All I can do is make myself a pot of coffee and hope that it'll hold me for the required workday. A dull pounding in the back of my head, like the butt of a gun threatening my existence, tells me that it's time to go."
Activities

5 minutes for hook and intro

Give 10 minutes for going over rubric and assignment and questions

TUE 5/18
We talked before about what defines poetry. Is it rhymes? Is it verse? Is it how many syllables it has? Did my poem rhyme? Did it have a beat? So what makes it poetry?
(Several students previously said that anything can be poetry, it depends if the writer says it's poetry.)
This is a type of poetry called free verse. What did you hear in this poem that might qualify this as poetry. (Read again if needed, take some ideas)
answer: metaphors, figurative language, personification
We are going to create our own poetry. This poetry will be a total of four polished pieces of poetry. For my poem, I went back and looked at it 5 or six times to change a word here or there. I wanted to use the right words, to hear if something "sounds" right. It's not an exact science, quite the opposite: you have to feel the poem.
Hand out assignment
Have students read the assignment and rubric (save questions for later)
We will use the next 3 (more?) class periods to write poetry independently. You have already started some poetry in your MMJ. I encourage you to look back at your poems, even if you think they are done, and read them again. Close your eyes and read it. Read it with the tone that you imagine it should be read in.

You will have the remaining 30 minutes to work on poetry in class
You can find your own spot in the room, but if you are disturbing your classmates, I will ask you to return to your seats.

FRI 5/21
Students will transition directly from writing their Friday letters to independent poetry writing the whole period.

TUE 5/25
Students will transition directly from writing their Friday letters to independent poetry writing the whole period.

Rubric: What is the grading rubric?Students will not be graded on this work...but may be part of their final poetry work
Sponge activity
If you are planning individual or small group work, what will students do if they finish early?
Students can work on additional poems or revise their poems, or create images to accompany their poems
Wrap-Up
How will you pull things together, have students process what they’ve learned, pose a question for further consideration?
I will give them a 3 minute warning. Students will share some of the themes they have written about.
Groupwork: If you are grouping at some point during the lesson…Why are you grouping? How are you grouping?
N/A--totally independent work
Classroom Environment: How can you use the classroom environment to support your lesson? Think about bulletin boards, morning message, display areas.
Students can sit around the room.

Materials Needed: What materials do you need to gather? What other preparation do you need to do?
MMJs; pencils
Potential Pitfalls What can you predict students may have misconceptions about? How will you address those confusions? Are there any other pitfalls?
Students might have a low tolerance for writing poetry. They will be allowed to choose some of the funnier forms of poetry

Differentiation: (optional in Fall) Do you address the range of interests, learning styles, and needs of students? Can you modify the lesson to be more effective?
Students can work at their own pace and choose the type of poetry they want to write.