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Saturday, May 6

  1. page Lyddie Discussion Questions edited .................................................ytuytiyytg6y78y8g78koyu8il........................…
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Monday, January 2

  1. page Lyddie Assessment edited Assessment By; Iyona Rogers Michele Alafat Assessment will take on three forms: Crazy Respo…

    Assessment
    By; Iyona RogersMichele Alafat
    Assessment will take on three forms:
    Crazy Responses Students will respond to discussion questions during each reading session, which will be noted as “Class Participation,” with notes about responses
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    Response Journal {Lesson_1_Sci_method.doc} StudentsStudents will keep
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    the novel Lyddie, as well as from information gathered through the study of the Industrial Revolution in their Social Studies class.Lyddie. Entries into
    Final Performance Assessment: Students will spend two class periods, and time at home, crafted two thorough, well thought out letters from Lyddie to her friend Diana addressing two big ideas. They will need to look back at their Reader Response Journal responses to demonstrate that they have thought about the big ideas throughout the book, and deepened their think h.
    Reader Response Journal
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Thursday, December 15

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Wednesday, November 30

  1. page Lyddie Assessment edited Assessment By; Iyona Rogers Assessment will take on three forms: Crazy Responses: Response…

    Assessment
    By; Iyona Rogers
    Assessment will take on three forms:
    Crazy Responses:Responses Students will
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    Reader Response Journal: StudentsJournal {Lesson_1_Sci_method.doc} Students will keep
    Final Performance Assessment: Students will spend two class periods, and time at home, crafted two thorough, well thought out letters from Lyddie to her friend Diana addressing two big ideas. They will need to look back at their Reader Response Journal responses to demonstrate that they have thought about the big ideas throughout the book, and deepened their think h.
    Reader Response Journal
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Saturday, October 8

  1. page Lyddie Lesson 12 edited ... Lyddie learns that the farm will be sold, breaking her hope to reunite the family Luke Steven…
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    Lyddie learns that the farm will be sold, breaking her hope to reunite the family
    Luke Stevens sent Lyddie a letter saying that they bought the farm, and asking for Lyddie to marry him. Lyddie is insulted by this, and says she can't be bought (she might think of this as slavery)
    Lyddie contemplates her situation and its parallels to slavery
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    is a potato
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    Skill Outcomes:
    Students will know how to compare and contrast themes in the book--slavery ("being bought" by a husband and "being bought" by the factory)
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Wednesday, April 20

  1. page Lyddie Lesson 12 edited Lesson SSSS Lesson Topic: Lyddie Teaching Date: (I will be teaching, part of Guided Lead Teac…
    LessonSSSS
    Lesson
    Topic: Lyddie
    Teaching Date: (I will be teaching, part of Guided Lead Teaching)
    Planning Date:
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Friday, March 25

  1. page Lyddie Lesson 12 edited ... Luke Stevens sent Lyddie a letter saying that they bought the farm, and asking for Lyddie to m…
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    Luke Stevens sent Lyddie a letter saying that they bought the farm, and asking for Lyddie to marry him. Lyddie is insulted by this, and says she can't be bought (she might think of this as slavery)
    Lyddie contemplates her situation and its parallels to slavery
    bonerFuck me daddy I'm big papi XXL
    Skill Outcomes:
    Students will know how to compare and contrast themes in the book--slavery ("being bought" by a husband and "being bought" by the factory)
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Thursday, March 24

  1. page Lyddie Lesson 12 edited ... Luke Stevens sent Lyddie a letter saying that they bought the farm, and asking for Lyddie to m…
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    Luke Stevens sent Lyddie a letter saying that they bought the farm, and asking for Lyddie to marry him. Lyddie is insulted by this, and says she can't be bought (she might think of this as slavery)
    Lyddie contemplates her situation and its parallels to slavery
    boner
    Skill Outcomes:
    Students will know how to compare and contrast themes in the book--slavery ("being bought" by a husband and "being bought" by the factory)
    (view changes)

Tuesday, March 15

  1. page Lyddie Final Reflection edited Final Reflection on Lyddie Literary Unit l reading session that I felt was bland and incoherent…

    Final Reflection on Lyddie Literary Unit
    l reading session that I felt was bland and incoherent, and another one that I radically changed my plans and infused it with life.
    Choose two learning activities
    The first plan I will look at is Lyddie Chapter 4/5 (parts of Lyddie lesson 3 and 4). I chose this lesson to analyze because it came with challenges. The biggest challenge was the focus for the lesson. I had originally planned to read chapters 3 and 4 together as part of the independent reading day, and chapters 5 and 6 together. Chapters 5 and 6 have the theme of slavery, where Lyddie comes face to face with a slave, and considers, for a moment, how much money she would get if she turned him in. The inquiry questions for the lesson were to focus on Lyddie's reaction to meeting a slave, and what it means for her and her own situation. Because the reading pace was not going at the rate I had planned for, the students ended up reading chapters 4 and 5. This had several implications. First of all, it was a lot of reading, so most of the lesson was reading and only a small portion of the lesson was left for discussing the text. I felt pressured to finish the chapters. Second, the theme was completely different than what I had planned for chapters 5 and 6. Chapter 5 contains a tense and awkward exchange between Lyddie and her brother. Only at the very end of the chapter does Lyddie come face to face with the slave. (This would have been immediately followed by reading the exchange between the two, and prefaced by a previous passage about how Lyddie might escape if she were a slave.) Although I did stick with my original discussion questions pieced together from the two lesson plans (from the independent reading lesson plan for chapters 3 and 4, and the slavery-themed lesson plan from chapters 5 and 6), the discussion didn't have the coherency I would have liked. I stopped in the middle of the reading to ask students to make some predictions, based on foreshadowing in the book. One student predicts that somehow she will get to the factory, and will probably run away. When I probe him for why he thinks that, he looks back to the book to show that on page 33, Lyddie talked about how she would escape if she were a slave. I propose another, unrelated question: What other books have we read that have this same theme of being trapped? This question was unplanned, and really detracted from the lesson. Students called out and just named other books that students read that year. I wrap it up by saying that when I read the passage about how Lyddie would chose a clear night with a high moon, it made me think of Sing Down the Moon. I move on to my pre-planned discussion question: What is the the story about the frogs? Why does Triphena tell it? MU responds that Triphena told a story about two frogs who fall into some butter, and one drowns, but the other one they find on top of the butter the next morning. From this, I check in to make sure students understand that butter starts out as cream and gets turned into butter by churning it. I ask why the author chooses to tell the story in the limited number of pages in a book. LM says that Triphena is a cook, so maybe it's a story a cook might know. He adds that maybe the author is trying to throw the reader off (they had just read a mystery where this happened a lot). Another student, Brandon, says it might be foreshadowing but doesn't say for what, and argues that the author is not limited by page number. Goldie says that she thinks Triphena is using a metaphor to tell Lyddie that you can either go with the flow and drown, or stand up for yourself and fight. I was happy that I got the discussion back on track, and that I allowed enough room for the students to discuss what they thought about the story, rather than me leading them there. I wanted to stay away from playing "Guess What's on the Teacher's Mind?" Another student read the rest of the chapter, and as he did, I wrote the reader response questions on the board: 1) Write the conversation Lyddie wished she had with her brother. 2) What was the significance of the talk of runaway slaves? and 3) Why does Lyddie tell herself not to be jealous of Charlie? I asked students to read the prompts and took questions. One student, DK, noted that it would be difficult to find textual evidence, connections and to put yourself in the shoes of the character for the first prompt. I said that I was challenging him to do just that. "You can look in the book to find evidence for what you think Lyddie would have liked to say to Charlie." I said this because there are passages in the book that specifically say she wished she could have
    have said this or that.
    I chose to analyze this lesson because it did not have the flow and coherence that I would have liked. I did not have a specific theme to focus on. If I had to teach this lesson again, I would have asked the students to only read chapter 4 and focus on the dialogue Lyddie wished she could have had with her brother, and the frog metaphor. I would have filled the additional time with discussion about how Lyddie's life is changing, about how industry is affecting her family, and what different characters' views on freedom are. I believe this would allow for more coherence in this and the following lesson, allow for more book talk, give students class time to write their reader responses, and allow me some breathing space.
    The second lesson I chose to focus on was chapter 22, Lyddie Lesson 15. I had rewritten the lesson based on previous learning, and what I wanted to focus on. The lesson followed the rewritten plan as far as themes and discussions, but had one additional activity: I decided in the last minute to include a dramatization of one particularly climactic scene. This change was based on a comment from my mentor that the students might be able to really step into the mind of the character by being able to act out a scene. I selected an important passage in which Lyddie, now unjustly fired from the mill for "moral turpitude," goes to her accuser's house with a letter she has written, addressed to his wife, telling of all his inappropriateness with the factory girls. I paused the student reader as Lyddie stepped up to his doorstep and I ask two students to come to the front of the room to act out the scene. (The game is called Freeze, where two students improvize the scene, and then another student, or the teacher, can pause the acting and put another student in. Students love this game.) The students were engaged in dramatization. MU yells and expresses anger, pretending to be Lyddie. JK tells Lyddie to go away. Goldie reveals she thought Brigid was dismissed, and some students chime in that she has misunderstood the text. Goldie states that Mr. Marsden is vile. Several students are able to participate in this acting activity, and I offer some tips, such as" "Remember to act it out as you think it would have happened" or "Remember he's a very stubborn man." Although it was a bit tough to get the students back in their seats and focused, the activity really livened the lesson, and showed student understanding of the character and her stubbornness. After the dramatization (the last student pair to act this out were very different in size), I say that I liked how the pair showed the difference in size between Lyddie and Mr. Marsden. The students are quick to correct me, and AB even finds the part in the text that states Lyddie was almost as big as Mr. Marsden.
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